Transbills

H.F. No. 2387 – UNOFFICIAL ENGROSSMENT OF SENATE OMNIBUS TRANSPORTATION FUNDING AND DEVELOPMENT

Author: Senator Janet B. Johnson

Date:
April 22, 1999

ARTICLE 1

TRANSPORTATION APPROPRIATIONS

Section 1. TOTAL TRANSPORTATION APPROPRIATIONS.

Section 2. TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATIONS.

Subdivision 1. Total MnDOT Appropriations.

Subdivision 2. Aeronautics. Appropriates $19,327,000 in FY00 and $19,410,000 in FY01 for aeronautics. Specifies that of this appropriation, airport development and assistance will receive $13,948,000 each year; aviation support will receive $5,247,000 in FY00 and $5,329,000 in FY01; and air transportation services will receive $132,000 in FY00 and $133,000 in FY01.

Subdivision 3. Transit. Appropriates $76.356 million in FY00 and $16.224 million in FY01 for transit. Specifies that of this amount, $15.556 million the first year and $15.406 million the second year is for Greater Minnesota transit assistance; $800,000 in FY00 and $818,000 in FY01 is for transit administration; and $60.0 million is for matching federal funds for the construction of light rail transit (LRT) in the Hiawatha Avenue corridor. Specifies that $150,000 the first year is for the Access to Jobs and Training program.

Subdivision 4. Railroads and Waterways. Appropriates $1.573 million in FY00 and $1.565 million in FY01 for railroads and waterways. Specifies that $40,000 the first year is to study Amtrak passenger service to connect the Twin Cities to Duluth and the Iron Range. Specifies that $10,000 the first year is to study the feasibility of extending the Northstar commuter rail corridor to Little Falls.

Subdivision 5. Motor Carrier Regulation. Appropriates $2.951 million in FY00 and $2.946 million in FY01 for motor carrier regulation. Specifies that $401,000 the first year and $330,000 the second year is for administration of motor carrier registration.

Subdivision 6. Local Roads (state-aid systems). Appropriates $365.063 million in FY00 and $371.624 million in FY01 from the county state-aid highway fund and appropriates $105.549 million in FY00 and $107.394 million in FY01 from the municipal state-aid fund to the office of state-aid for distribution to counties and cities.

Subdivision 7. State Roads.

(a) State Road Construction. Appropriates $275 million in federal highway aid each year and $239.434 million in FY00 and $238.452 million in FY01 from the trunk highway fund for state road construction. Directs the commissioner to transfer $2.358 million each year to the trunk highway revolving loan account in the trunk highway fund. Requires the commissioner to use $1.0 million the first year for matching grants to counties or cities for trunk highway noise barriers.

(b) Highway Debt Service. Appropriates $13.949 million in FY00 and $13.175 million in FY01 for debt service.

(c) Research and Investment Management. Appropriates $12.450 million in FY00 and $12.597 million in FY01. Specifies that $600,000 each year is for planning grants to regional planning organizations, joint powers boards, or MnDOT districts; $216,000 each year is for grants to metropolitan planning organizations outside the seven-county metropolitan area; and $75,000 the first year and $25,000 the second year is for transportation planning relating to the 2000 census.

(d) Central Engineering Services. Appropriates $67.965 million in FY00 and $69.068 million in FY01 for central engineering services.

(e) Design and Construction Engineering. Appropriates $79.994 million in FY00 and $81.374 million in FY01 for design and construction engineering.

(f) State Road Operations. Appropriates $211.203 million in FY00 and $217.061 million in FY01 for state road operations. Specifies that $3.0 million each year is to address staffing levels by adding positions in highway maintenance and program delivery. Specifies that $2.0 million the first year and $4.0 million the second year is for pavement striping.

(g) Electronic Communications. Appropriates $8.678 million in FY00 and $5.543 million in FY01 for electronic communications. Of this amount, $9,000 each year from the general fund is for operation of the Roosevelt signal tower and $1.572 million from the general fund and $1.622 million from the trunk highway fund in FY00 is for purchase of equipment for the 800 MHZ radio system.

Subdivision 8. General Support.

(a) General Management. Appropriates $28.523 million in FY00 and $29.181 million in FY01 for general management.

(b) General Services. Appropriates $11.708 million in FY00 and $11.765 million in FY01 for general services. Specifies that $1.0 million each year is for implementation of the department’s plan for shared information resources.

Subdivision 9. Buildings. Appropriates $3.376 million in FY00 and $3.375 million in FY01 for ongoing operational building needs.

Subdivision 10. Transfers. Allows the commissioner to transfer unencumbered fund balances among the appropriations for the trunk highway fund and the state airports fund. Specifies that no transfers may be made from the state road construction or debt service appropriations. Requires the commissioner of finance to transfer $4.4 million the first year and $4.5 million the second year from the flexible account in the county state-aid highway fund to the municipal turnback account and the remainder in each year to the county state-aid turnback account.

Subdivision 11. Use of State Road Appropriations. Specifies that money appropriated for state road construction for any fiscal year before FY01 is available during FY00 and FY01 provided the money is spent on the project for which the money was originally encumbered during the fiscal year for which it was appropriated.

Subdivision 12. Contingent Appropriation. Allows the commissioner to transfer all or part of the balance in the trunk highway fund to an appropriation for trunk highway construction, trunk highway maintenance in order to meet an emergency, or to pay tort or environmental claims.

Section 3. METROPOLITAN COUNCIL TRANSIT. Appropriates $57.151 million the first year and $56.801 million the second year from the general fund for metropolitan transit. Specifies that $350,000 the first year is for the Access to Jobs and Training program.

Section 4. PUBLIC SAFETY.

Subdivision 1. DPS Total Appropriations.

Subdivision 2. Administration and Related Services.

(a) Appropriates $374,000 in FY00 and $382,000 in FY01 for the office of communications.

(b) Appropriates $7.653 million in FY00 and $7.811 million in FY01 for public safety support. Specifies that $326,000 each year is for payment of public safety survivor benefits, $244,000 the first year and $314,000 the second year is for the public safety officer’s benefit account, $508,000 each year is for soft body armor reimbursements and specifies a number of transfers between the general fund, trunk highway fund, and highway users fund for costs unrelated to the purposes of the funds.

(c) Appropriates $4.713 million in FY00 and $4.783 million in FY01 for technical support services.

Subdivision 3. State Patrol.

(a) Appropriates $47.362 million in FY00 and $47.647 million in FY01 from the trunk highway fund for patrolling highways. Specifies that $1.169 million the first year is for replacement of a state patrol helicopter and $735,000 the first year and $800,000 the second year is for the trooper recruit training academy.

(b) Appropriates $6.013 million in FY00 and $6.117 million in FY01 from the trunk highway fund for commercial vehicle enforcement.

(c) Appropriates $2.734 million in FY00 and $2.805 million in FY 01 for capitol security. Specifies that $229,000 the first year and $230,000 the second year from the general fund are for capitol security personnel and $153,000 the first year and $154,000 the second year from the trunk highway fund are for additional trooper personnel for the protection of elected state officials.

(d) Appropriates $1.710 million in FY00 and $1.752 million in FY01 for state patrol support.

Subdivision 4. Driver and Vehicle Services.

(a) Appropriates $15.437 million in FY00 and $15.435 million in FY01 for vehicle registration and title. Specifies that $45,000 the first year is for purchase of an optical scanner.

(b) Appropriates $1.584 million in FY00 and $1.613 million in FY01 for interstate registration and reciprocity.

(c) Appropriates $21.176 million in FY00 and $21.429 million in FY01 for licensing drivers. Specifies that $1.095 million the first year and $800,000 the second year is for improved driver testing services.

(d) Appropriates $648,000 in FY00 and $662,000 in FY01 for driver and vehicle services support.

Subdivision 5. Traffic Safety. Appropriates $365,000 in FY00 and $371,000 in FY01 for traffic safety, of which $61,000 each year is from the general fund for bicycle safety grants and the remainder is from the trunk highway fund.

Subdivision 6. Pipeline Safety. Appropriates $947,000 in FY00 and $965,000 in FY01 from the special revenue fund for pipeline safety.

Section 5. MINNESOTA SAFETY COUNCIL. Appropriates $94,000 in FY00 and $95,000 in FY01 to the Minnesota Safety Council.

Section 6. OFFICE OF STRATEGIC AND LONG RANGE PLANNING. Appropriates $50,000 the first year from the general fund for preparation of a long-range statewide development strategy.

Section 7. GENERAL CONTINGENT ACCOUNTS. Appropriates $375,000 each year for general contingencies.

Section 8. TORT CLAIMS. Appropriates $600,000 each year to the Commissioner of Finance for tort claims.

Section 9. Amends the state roads appropriation from the FY98-99 biennium to provide that the appropriation for 800 MHz equipment from the trunk highway fund does not cancel but is available until spent.

Section 10. Amends the state patrol appropriation for the FY98-99 biennium to provide that the $150,000 appropriation from the general fund for assistance to trooper candidates to prepare them for trooper candidate school does not cancel but is available until spent.

ARTICLE 2

Section 1 amends the definition of “limousine” in the motor vehicle registration chapter to be consistent with a previously enacted definition in chapter 221, the motor carrier chapter.

Section 2 exempts from the vehicle registration tax a vehicle owned by a licensed commercial driving school, used exclusively for driver training. The tax-exempt number plates displayed by this type of vehicle must show the name of the commercial driving school that owns the vehicle.

Section 3 allows vehicle purchasers from motor vehicle dealers to pay registration tax prorated on a monthly basis for the remainder of the registration period during which the purchase takes place.

Section 4 allows a dealer to withhold registration tax due on a vehicle in the year after it is acquired for sale and/or demonstration. The section deletes the current requirement that, to take advantage of this provision, the vehicle must be received and transfer filed before the current-year registration expires. The person who buys the vehicle from the dealer is required to pay only the vehicle registration tax prorated on a monthly basis for the remainder of the year.

Section 5 allows the registrar to suspend or revoke a motor vehicle registration when the transferee fails to execute an application for a new certificate of title within 30 days of the date of sale.

Section 6 changes from 14 to ten days the period within which a transferee must deliver a title transfer to avoid paying a $2 fee.

Section 7 increases from $5 to $10 the reinstatement fee after suspension of registration for a transferee’s failure to file a title certificate within 30 days. Current law imposes the reinstatement fee for failure to file within 10 days.

Section 8 specifies that the certificate of title must include a detachable postcard entitled “Notice of Sale” for the owner to record a purchaser’s name, address, driver’s license number, and the date of sale. The Notice must explain the owner’s responsibility to complete and return the form or to transmit required information electronically.

Section 9 requires a vehicle owner, within ten days of the date of sale other than a sale to a motor vehicle dealer, to complete and return the detached postcard with required information or to submit the required information electronically.

Section 10 subjects a transferee to vehicle registration suspension for failure to execute an application for a new certificate of title within ten days.

Section 11 clarifies that a seller who has complied with statutory responsibilities, without regard to completion and return of the Notice of Sale, is not liable as owner for damages resulting from operation of the vehicle.

Section 12 provides that failure to notify the department of facts included in the Notice of Sale is not a misdemeanor.

Section 13 adds a definition of “school zone” to the definition section of chapter 169. This does not change the current definition of “school zone” but merely states it in a different section in order to apply it to the entire chapter.

Section 14 is a technical amendment to conform a definition reference to the new definition in this bill of “motor carrier of passengers.”

Section 15 requires the commissioner to establish a maximum speed limit of 25 mph in a school zone on a trunk highway after a school board and local authority jointly request this action.

Section 16 removes an invalid cross-reference.

Section 17 specifies that a local authority does not need the consent of the commissioner when establishing a speed limit in a school zone in accordance with section 15.

Section 18 allows a vehicle engaged in deliveries to residences to project a white light to the rear, from a top-mounted sign, if the sign projects one or more additional colors to the rear.

Section 19 allows a vehicle engaged in deliveries to residences to project a red light to the front, from a top-mounted sign, if the sign projects one or more additional colors to the front.

Section 20 increases the allowable length of recreational vehicle combinations from 60 feet to 65 feet.

Section 21 requires driver’s license applicants 18 years of age and older to possess an instruction permit for at least 6 months before becoming eligible for a driver’s license. This requirement already applies to applicants under 18.

Section 22 applies the six-month instruction permit requirement to applicants who have not previously been licensed to drive. The six-month holding period will be reduced by any time an applicant has held an instruction permit from another jurisdiction.

Section 23 provides that a person under age 18 who has completed classroom driver training in a certified home-school with classroom materials approved by the commissioner of public safety, and who is enrolled in an approved behind-the-wheel driver education program is eligible to apply for an instruction permit.

Section 24 requires the department of public safety to provide photo identification equipment to a newly appointed driver license agent if the department had provided the equipment to the previous agent before January 1, 1999.

Section 25 exempts home schools from the licensing requirements for driver training schools.

Section 26 adopts a federal definition of “public authorities” within the statutory definition of “directional signs.”

Section 27 requires specifications issued by the Department of Transportation relating to the procurement of underground storage tanks to be written in such a way that they include all types of fiberglass and steel underground tanks approved by the pollution control agency.

Section 28 specifies that the required local match for public transit operators in large urbanized areas is 50 percent rather than the current 55 percent.

Section 29 creates a mobility fund to include proceeds of the motor vehicle sales tax. Money in the fund is for transit capital costs.

Section 30 defines, with respect to commuter rail planning, the terms “advanced corridor plan,” “preliminary engineering plan,” and “final design plan.”

Section 31 gives the Commissioner of Transportation responsibility for planning, developing, constructing, operating, and maintaining commuter rail. The section allows the commissioner to enter into a memorandum of understanding with public and private entities, including regional rail authorities, to carry out these activities.

Section 32, subdivision 1 requires the commissioner to adopt a commuter rail system plan by January 15, 2000, and to update it as necessary. The commissioner must consult with regional rail authorities in preparing the plan. The commissioner may incorporate elements of regional rail authority plans to avoid duplication of effort.

Section 32, subdivision 2 requires the system plan to be approved by metropolitan planning organizations in areas where commuter rail will be located, before the commissioner may begin final design. The commissioner must act in conformance with the adopted plan. Final design plans must be consistent with the plan.

Section 32, subdivision 3 requires the plan to include engineering standards.

Section 32, subdivision 4 requires the commissioner and metropolitan planning organizations to ensure that commuter rail facilities are planned, designed, and implemented to provide a unified, integrated, and efficient multi-modal transportation system.

Section 33, subdivision 1 requires the commissioner to hold a public hearing on the physical design component of the advanced corridor plan.

Section 33, subdivision 2 requires the commissioner to submit the physical design component to the governing body of each city, county, and town where the proposed route is located. The local government must review and comment on the plan within 45 days. Cities and towns must approve or disapprove station location and design and describe specific amendments that would cause the city or town to withdraw its disapproval.

Section 33, subdivision 3 allows the commissioner to modify the commuter rail advanced corridor plan after hearing and receipt of comment.

Section 33, subdivision 4 requires the commissioner to submit the advanced corridor plan to each MPO in which the route is located before constructing commuter rail. The MPO must hold a hearing on the plan and determine within 60 days whether the plan is consistent with the development guide. If the plan is inconsistent, the MPO must submit proposed amendments, which must be incorporated by the commissioner.

Section 33, subdivision 5 establishes a rail corridor coordinating committee to advise the commissioner on commuter rail issues. The subdivision specifies the members. A joint powers board existing on April 1, 1999, shall perform the functions of the committee.

Section 34 allows the commissioner, in cooperation with MPOs, to apply for funding from federal, state, regional, local, and private sources for commuter rail.

Section 35 allows the commissioner to contract for operation of commuter rail facilities and to test the service. The commissioner must coordinate with transit providers to ensure integration of commuter rail with light rail and bus systems.

Section 36 is a technical change to conform a cross-reference with statutory changes included in this bill.

Section 37 is a technical change, deleting obsolete language.

Section 38, subdivision 1, requires the Department of Transportation to develop a corridor improvement plan for grade crossings on the railway corridor that runs through Winona, Olmsted, Dodge, Steele, Waseca, Blue Earth, Brown, Redwood, Lyon, and Lincoln counties.

Section 38, subdivision 2, clause (a) requires the corridor improvement plan to assess each crossing based on future train and vehicle volumes and identify minimum improvements for crossings with moderate levels of exposure, consistent with department rules. Crossings with a level of exposure exceeding 300,000 (daily vehicle traffic multiplied by daily number of trains at the crossing) or that otherwise meet criteria stated in rules are candidates for grade separation.

Section 38, subdivision 2, clause (b) requires the department to consider crossings that are candidates for closure, according to department rules.

Section 38, subdivision 2, clause (c), directs the department to review community plans developed by a railroad company and local government for compliance with minimum criteria for crossing improvements. Community plans supersede inconsistent elements of the corridor improvement plan.

Section 38, subdivision 3 allows affected railroad companies and local governments to participate in developing the corridor improvement plan. An affected local government must have an opportunity to review the plan before the commissioner can execute an agreement with a railroad company and forward the plan recommendations to the federal Surface Transportation Board. The department may comment to a governing body or provide information on the plan related to construction or EIS preparation.

Section 38, subdivision 4 directs the commissioner to submit the final plan to any affected area transportation partnership, local government, and railroad company within the corridor to provide planning guidance on grade crossing safety. The development of a corridor improvement plan does not bind the state or local government to an implementation timetable or to funding proposed safety upgrades unless otherwise specifically agreed to in the plan.

Section 39 amends the definition of “motor carrier” in the motor carrier chapter by deleting language relating to operating authority. “Motor carrier” refers to a person engaged in for-hire transportation of property or passengers, except those providing building mover service, limousine service, or any other service enumerated in section 221.025.

Section 40 is a technical change.

Section 41 is a technical change.

Section 42 adds a new definition of “motor carrier of passengers” which restricts this category to transportation in vehicles designed for eight or more persons, including the driver.

Section 43 adds a new definition of “small vehicle passenger service” which restricts this category to transportation in vehicles designed for seven or fewer persons, including the driver.

Section 44, subdivision 1, makes technical changes.

Section 44, subdivision 2 authorizes the commissioner to invoke sanctions for serious or repeated violations of chapter 221 or for repeated violations of local traffic and parking ordinances.

Section 44, subdivision 3 gives a carrier a right to an administrative hearing following notice of sanctions.

Section 45 contains technical amendments.

Section 46 exempts from operating authority requirements passenger service provided under contract to the Department of Transportation or the Metropolitan Council.

Section 47 clarifies that the existing motor carrier registration system applies only to motor carriers of property.

Section 48 establishes the passenger carrier registration system.

Section 48, subdivision 1 requires the carrier to file a federal motor carrier identification report form and a vehicle registration form with the department.

Section 48, subdivision 2 identifies who is authorized to sign required forms.

Section 48, subdivision 3 requires the commissioner to audit the carrier’s records, inspect all vehicles for safety, or review department of public safety records of vehicle safety inspections, verify that the carrier has a Minnesota office, audit the driver’s criminal background and safety records, and verify compliance with insurance requirements. This investigation must be completed within 90 days of issuing a new certificate of registration and before issuing annual renewals of the certificate.

Section 48, subdivision 4 states eligibility criteria for a certificate of registration and provides that the certificate is valid for one year.

Section 48, subdivision 5 directs MnDOT to suspend the registration of a carrier with an unsatisfactory safety rating. A carrier may request an additional audit to have the suspension rescinded.

Section 48, subdivision 6 requires annual renewal of the carrier’s registration.

Section 48, subdivision 7 imposes a $1,000 annual registration fee, which is to be deposited in the trunk highway fund.

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Section 48, subdivision 8 exempts passenger carriers from entry barriers and rate regulation.

Section 49 is a technical change.

Section 50 contains technical amendments, deleting the requirement that passenger carriers file annual financial reports and deleting references to the transportation regulation board.

Section 51 contains technical amendments concerning the application of federal safety regulations.

Section 52 exempts limousines from the vehicle identification requirement that each vehicle display the carrier’s name and address on the power unit.

Section 53 is a technical cross-reference change.

Section 54 is a technical cross-reference change.

Section 55, subdivision 1 contains technical and conforming amendments.

Section 55, subdivision 2 requires a city that licenses and regulates small vehicle passenger service to do so by ordinance. The ordinance must provide for driver qualifications, insurance, vehicle safety, and periodic vehicle inspections.

Section 55, subdivision 3 allows the Metropolitan Airports Commission to regulate ground transportation to and from the airport. Regulation may include the number and type of service, concession agreements, and vehicle standards.

Section 56 is a technical cross-reference change.

Section 57 contains technical amendments relating to the initial motor carrier contact program.

Section 58 increases the per-vehicle annual registration fee for motor carriers of passengers from $40 to $80 and makes technical changes.

Section 59 changes insurance requirements to conform to federal rules concerning minimum liability coverage.

Section 60 contains technical amendments to eliminate certain record keeping requirements that have been preempted by federal law.

Section 61, subdivision 1 requires motor carriers of passengers to conduct a background check of drivers. This check must be renewed every three years.

Section 61, subdivision 2 governs driver background checks by incorporating sections of statute popularly known as the “Kari Koskinen Manager Background Check Act.”

Section 61, subdivision 3 requires the carrier to keep background check records which must be made available to the commissioner on request.

Section 62 contains technical amendments.

Section 63 is a technical change.

Section 64 provides for issuance of a notice of suspension upon the carrier’s failure to maintain insurance, renew permits, or pay vehicle registration fees.

Section 65 provides for cancellation of a carrier’s registration for failure to comply with chapter requirements within one year of the effective date of a suspension.

Section 66 is a technical change.

Section 67 is a technical change.

Section 68 contains technical amendments.

Section 69 is a technical change to correct cross-references.

Section 70 is a technical change to correct cross-references in connection with motor carriers of passengers.

Section 71 deletes sunset language which allocated one percent of all gasoline usage to snowmobiles only for 1998 and 1999, thereby making the one percent a permanent allocation.

Section 72 allocates the proceeds of the sales tax on motor vehicles as follows: 73 percent to the general fund, 5 percent to the mobility fund, and 22 percent to the highway user tax distribution fund. This section takes effect July 1, 2001, but only if the constitutional amendment proposed in section 98 is adopted at the 2000 general election.

Section 73 defines “first year of life,” for purposes of aircraft registration, as the year the aircraft was manufactured.

Section 74 divides the category of collector aircraft into two categories – antique aircraft and classic aircraft – and provides for special plates for both categories, which may be transferred to a new owner.

Section 75 requires a town ordinance regulating taxicabs or small vehicle passenger service to provide, at a minimum, for driver qualifications, insurance, vehicle safety, and vehicle inspections.

Section 76 prohibits a regional rail authority from expending state or federal funds for development of light rail or commuter rail transit, unless the activity is consistent with a commuter rail system plan adopted by the commissioner and a LRT plan adopted by the Metropolitan Council. The activity must be carried out pursuant to a memorandum of understanding between the authority and the commissioner after consultation with the Metropolitan Council.

Section 77 requires a city ordinance to regulate taxicabs or small vehicle passenger service to provide for driver qualifications, insurance, vehicle safety, and vehicle inspection.

Section 78 conforms statutory language concerning transit commission petitions for rate changes, with passenger carrier deregulation language.

Section 79 allows the Metropolitan Council to incorporate elements of the plans of regional rail authorities into its LRT facilities plan and deletes references to regional rail authorities.

Section 80 gives specific authorization to the Commissioner of Transportation to use a design-build method of project development and construction for LRT.

Section 81 deletes references to regional rail authorities in sections of law relating to LRT planning.

Section 82 deletes references to regional rail authorities.

Section 83 removes a member appointed by the metropolitan LRT joint powers board from the corridor management committee established to advise the commissioner on the design and construction of light rail.

Section 84 requires the Metropolitan Radio Board to report to the legislature by March 2000, concerning the status of the 800-MHz system.

Section 85 corrects cross-references.

Section 86 delays the sunset of the Metropolitan Radio Board from July 1, 1999, to July 1, 2002.

Section 87 requires that $6,500,000 for LRT and $1,000,000 for commuter rail transit appropriated in the 1998 capital improvement bill from the general fund for grants to regional rail authorities may be distributed only upon execution of a work program memorandum of understanding with the commissioner. The $3,000,000 appropriated in 1998 for the Riverview corridor may also be used for the central corridor between downtown St. Paul and downtown Minneapolis. The $1,500,000 appropriated for a feasibility study in the Northstar corridor must also be used to study an extension of commuter rail service from St. Cloud to Little Falls.

Section 88 requires the Commissioner of Transportation to designate two weeks in October 1999 and two weeks in June 2000 during which meters on freeway access ramps must flash yellow lights. The commissioner must evaluate the effects of discontinuing meter operation and report to the legislature by January 15, 2001.

Section 89 establishes a priority for construction of LRT to connect downtown Minneapolis, downtown St. Paul, the Mall of America, and the Minneapolis – St. Paul (MSP) International Airport. These lines must be constructed before any other LRT extensions or corridors.

Section 90 requires the Metropolitan Council, in consultation with the Commissioner of Transportation, regional railroad authorities in the metropolitan area, and the metropolitan LRT joint powers board, to develop a regional master plan for transit to be presented to the legislature by February 1, 2000.

Section 91 requires the Commissioner of Transportation to study the restoration and extension of Amtrak rail passenger service connecting the Twin Cities, Duluth, and the Iron Range. The study must include connections with potential commuter rail and light rail routes, operating and capital costs, projected ridership, condition of track and depots, analysis of revenue sources, and examination of at least four other successful Amtrak-state-local partnerships.

Section 92 requires the Metropolitan Council to study the potential regulation of taxicabs by a single agency in the metropolitan area and to make recommendations to the legislature by February 1, 2000.

Section 93 directs the Department of Public Safety to review sections of Minnesota statutes relating to vehicle lighting and recommend any law or rule modifications to clarify the range of allowable vehicle lighting, to give notice to the public and law enforcement concerning illegal lighting, to streamline the administrative process to approve or disapprove lighting devices, and to allow vehicles to display the maximum range of lighting consistent with public safety. These recommendations must be presented to the legislature by February 15, 2000.

Section 94 requires the Office of Strategic and Long-range Planning to develop a 20-year state development strategy in coordination with the Metropolitan Council, and the Commissioners of Transportation, Trade and Economic Development, and Natural Resources. Among other things, the strategy will include forecasts and policies relating to the connection between transportation, land use, environmental protection, energy, and economic development, and recommendations for coordinated state investments and legislative changes necessary to achieve identified goals and policies. By February 15, 2000, a proposal for preparing a state development strategy based on a prototype strategy for the I-94 corridor between the metropolitan area and St. Cloud must be submitted to the legislature.

Section 95 converts existing certificates and permits held by passenger carriers to certificates of registration, so existing carriers do not have to file an initial registration.

Section 96 extends existing regulation of motor carrier service at MSP International Airport until July 1, 2000.

Section 97 requires the Commissioner of Transportation to erect, at the intersection of Pipestone county state-aid highway 18 and trunk highways 23 and 30, one sign in each direction displaying directions to the New Life Treatment Center.

Section 98 proposes a constitutional amendment to dedicate at least 22 percent of motor vehicle sales tax proceeds to the highway user tax distribution fund, and at least 5 percent of motor vehicle sales tax proceeds into a transit capital fund.

Section 99 requires the constitutional amendment to be submitted at the 2000 election.

Section 100 instructs the revisor to correct cross-references.

Section 101 repeals statutes in the motor carrier chapter that have been preempted by federal law or are in conflict with the provisions of the bill. The section also repeals the section that requires the formation of a LRT joint powers board in the metropolitan area.

Section 102 states effective dates. Sections relating to vehicle lighting (18, 19, and 93), allocation of gasoline usage to snowmobiles (71), Metropolitan Radio Board (84 and 86), strategic planning report (94), and New Life Treatment Center directional signs (97) take immediate effect. Sections relating to vehicle lighting are repealed on July 31, 2000. Sections dealing with motor carrier deregulation (1, 36, 37, 39, 70, 75, 77, 78, and 85) are effective January 1, 2000. Sections dealing with motor vehicle registration (5 to 7 and 8 to 12) are effective July 1, 2000. Section 29, which creates a mobility fund, is effective July 1, 2001. Section 72, which allocates proceeds of the motor vehicle sales tax, is effective July 1, 2001, but takes effect only if the proposed constitutional amendment passes. If the proposed amendment fails, any vehicle registration tax relief enacted in 1999 or 2000 will become ineffective.

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